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Fast Pack Friday: Submission – Gabriel Hall

Here is a great submission from Gabriel Hall. I really like his patch layouts, the multiple use of iComms across the top webbing of the Fast Pack Litespeed. What particularly stands out is his two clever modifications. Firstly the folding up the Transporter Tail (shown best in the 2nd image) and also his top compression strap clip storage solution (3rd image).

It’s also worth checking out the Haley Strategic Kleen Kanteen Carrier featured in the last two images. I’ve seen this before and thought it looked pretty cool. Here are the details of the configuration, including how he’s folded up the tail:

There are 3 iComms and an OP1 on the front, a single magazine pouch for my iPhone on the left side. A FILO blades Halcron karambit on the right side. 

The tail is rolled under by folding and clipping the top clips together (behind the face of the tail) then rolled down and the bottom clips used to fasten it down. The top pack clips are then fed down the side via the Molle for retention. I have used the top clip retention trick using the special clips from MilSpec Monkey. 

Also, special guest: the Haley Strategic Kleen Kanteen carrier. Solid piece of work. Has room for a couple patches on a pouch that can fit some EDC or regular pocket item (i.e. gym trip: wallet, phone, headphones, gym pass, etc).

2014 close-support sapper, Royal Engineers, Helmand Province

A photographer, Thom Atkinson, has documented 13 military kits in a series called ‘Soldiers Inventories’. I’ve picked a few to share with you guys over a couple of posts so they can be enjoyed individually, in all their glory. It will also show which are the most popular kits. 

By its very nature, war requires a soldier to be prepared for every possible eventuality. The sheer amount of gear that is demanded by this level of preparedness means good pack configuration is a necessity. It is really interesting to see how a soldiers carry has developed over time, so I encourage you all to check out the full set here

Thanks to thenewartemis for their post that reminded me about seeing this in their post here. Below is a breakdown of what is featured above:

  1. Silva compass - used for basic navigation and fire control orders
  2. Karabiner - used for securing kit and equipment to the vehicles
  3. Osprey body armour shoulder and neck attachments - the armour increases protection but can be very restrictive so these parts are detachable depending on the threat assessment
  4. Osprey body armour; can be fitted with pouches to carry everything from ammunition, water, first aid kits and grenade or with plates and protective attachments (as shown)
  5. Notebook
  6. Warm weather hat
  7. Spare clothing including underwear trousers, UBAS (Under body armour Shirt) and normal shirt
  8. Dog tags
  9. A desert issued belt
  10. Beret - used for repatriation ceremonies, vigils and large parades
  11. Shemagh - to soak up sweat and also a dust guard
  12. Gloves
  13. Sandals – issued kit, as soldiers may need to run for cover even while showering
  14. Boots
  15. Multi tool
  16. Washkit
  17. GSR - general service respirator
  18. A housewife – a basic sewing kit; a soldier has to repair his own rips and tears on the ground
  19. Socks, scarf, wristwatch
  20. Camel pack - drinking water pack
  21. Cooker and mug and tea making kit
  22. Rations - quantity will depend on the task but soldiers normally carry about 24 hours worth
  23. First aid kit including the (black) tourniquet and (grey) first field dressing
  24. Ballistic protection - used to protect the groin from IED blast
  25. Knee pads - offer protection to a soldier whilst “taking a knee” from the heat of the ground or rocky areas
  26. Sleeping bag with an inflatable roll mat
  27. Camera, cigarettes
  28. Radio - BOWMAN Radio system (HF, VHF or even SAT Comms), daysack could also be fitted with ECM (Electronic counter measures)
  29. Personal role radio - used for line of sight communications within a small patrol
  30. Magazine
  31. Envelopes
  32. Mine extraction kit fitted with a mine prodder, instruction and mine marking kit
  33. Weapon cleaning kit
  34. Holster
  35. Pistol - used as a second weapon system and in confined spaces or where a “long” weapon is unsuitable. Sig and Glock have mostly replaced the Browning 9mm calibre
  36. Bar mine - anti-tank landmine
  37. Head torch - can be fitted with coloured lenses for more tactical situations
  38. Bayonet and bayonet scabbard
  39. SA80 A2 fitted with a desert hand guard, upgraded flash eliminator and bipod, all issued for Afghanistan and a SUSAT sight system. It is 5.56 calibre and is here issued with 6 magazines which can hold 30 rounds each
  40. Ballistic eye protection - normally goggles or sunglasses
  41. Mk 6 Helmet fitted with Helmet mounted night vision systems
  42. iPad - personal effect for down time
  43. Poncho

1982 Royal Marine Commando, Falklands conflict

A photographer, Thom Atkinson, has documented 13 military kits in a series called ‘Soldiers Inventories’. I’ve picked a few to share with you guys over a couple of posts so they can be enjoyed individually, in all their glory. It will also show which are the most popular kits. 

By its very nature, war requires a soldier to be prepared for every possible eventuality. The sheer amount of gear that is demanded by this level of preparedness means good pack configuration is a necessity. It is really interesting to see how a soldiers carry has developed over time, so I encourage you all to check out the full set here

Thanks to thenewartemis for their post that reminded me about seeing this in their post here. Below is a breakdown of what is featured above:

  1. High leg boots; the marines were the only service personnel to have high leg boots, the army had ankle-high boots
  2. Black nuclear biological chemical (NBC) protective over boots
  3. Putty– a long strip fabric wrapped around trouser leg and three pairs of socks
  4. Arctic pattern mittens with waterproof outers
  5. Two pairs of gloves – Northern Ireland standard issue black leather gloves and white cotton contact gloves for handling weapons in arctic conditions
  6. Vests, underpants and standard issue G10 wristwatch
  7. Personal items including money, cigarettes and lighter
  8. Arctic parka with hood
  9. Thermal lining jacket
  10. Camouflage windproof trousers, green thermal trousers and ‘housewife’, a canvas pouch with spare buttons and needle and thread to repair clothes in the field
  11. White lightweight nylon over suit to wear when the weather is snowing
  12. Camouflage windproof jacket, green woollen jumper and shirt
  13. Royal Marines beret
  14. Royal Marine steel helmet with camouflage net
  15. British army cold weather cap
  16. Water bottle
  17. Scarf
  18. British army notebook and pens, compass and protractor, which were used for marking maps, for example plotting minefields. Below a clasp knife, can opener and blade
  19. 35m film camera, personal effects
  20. Torch
  21. Wash kit, including soap, razor, comb and toothbrush
  22. Jacket and trousers for NBC suit
  23. F6 respirator and spare filter
  24. Field dressing
  25. Decontamination kit
  26. Fuller’s earth, similar talcum powder, preserves gas mask rubber
  27. Detector paper – Nuclear biological detector kit used to detect poisonous chemicals
  28. Knife, fork, spoon and can opener
  29. Aluminium mess tins
  30. Hexamine cooker
  31. Arctic 24 hour ration pack, including tin of bacon roll, spam, tinned beans, chicken curry, suet pudding, boiled sweets, tea bags and toilet paper. Mars bars were available to buy on the ship on the way over and were prized possessions
  32. Plastic mug
  33. Pair of waterproof gators
  34. Sandbag – every soldier carried at least one; used to fortify positions by digging dirt to fill the hessian bag
  35. Marine issued Bergen rucksack, with a carry mat. Below it an arctic sleeping bag in waterproof case
  36. Shovel
  37. 66m anti tank weapon – disposable one shot rocket launcher
  38. Suit sight with 4x magnifaction, which goes on rifle; during the Falklands conflict the night vision scope was widely issued of the first time
  39. Individual weapon sight
  40. Rifle cleaning kit
  41. Long green ammunition band – 762 linked ammunition for the squad general purpose machine guns
  42. Six spare magazines
  43. Black insulation tape and No 83 smoke grenade
  44. 2 x L2A2 fragmentation grenades
  45. Clansman 349 radio with an earpiece and throat microphone that picks up on the vibration of the voice
  46. Bayonet
  47. Cotton bandolier containing 50 rounds
  48. (left) loading tool for magazines (r) protector for the foresight
  49. L1a1 rifle self loading rifle; a very light, accurate and powerful rifle that fired 7.62mm rounds
  50. Dog tags

1944 lance corporal, Parachute Brigade, Battle of Arnhem

A photographer, Thom Atkinson, has documented 13 military kits in a series called ‘Soldiers Inventories’. I’ve picked a few to share with you guys over a couple of posts so they can be enjoyed individually, in all their glory. It will also show which are the most popular kits. 

By its very nature, war requires a soldier to be prepared for every possible eventuality. The sheer amount of gear that is demanded by this level of preparedness means good pack configuration is a necessity. It is really interesting to see how a soldiers carry has developed over time, so I encourage you all to check out the full set here

Thanks to thenewartemis for their post that reminded me about seeing this in their post here. Below is a breakdown of what is featured above:

  1. Parachute harness with parachute
  2. Jump smock camouflage first issued in 1942 (the pattern was only replaced in 1980) and over smock worn when jumping
  3. Toggle rope – general purpose rope
  4. 37 pattern battledress jacket; the patches on sleeve are for the 1st and 6th airborne division; wrist watch on the right sleeve; dog tags on the left sleeve
  5. Braces
  6. Gators
  7. Socks
  8. Standard British army issued boots
  9. Gloves
  10. Leather wallet
  11. Camouflage scarf
  12. Battledress trousers, colourless shirt, undervest and underpants
  13. Aluminium mess tin, mug, water bottle and ration kit including tin of corn beef, boiled sweets and a large block of chocolate
  14. Drop bag with rope attached
  15. Shovel – kept in the drop bag
  16. Cutlery, basic washing and shaving kit, and spare boot laces on a wash towel
  17. Entrenching tool – for digging shell scrapings
  18. Handle for the entrenching tool
  19. Ammunition pouches
  20. Belt and cross straps
  21. Rifle – the Sten Mark V submachine gun was first issued in 1944 and given first to airborne troops. It was first used for D-Day, and then again for Arnhem. Underneath is the cleaning kit
  22. Bayonet
  23. Pocket loading tool for magazine
  24. Magazine
  25. Bandolier with seven magazines
  26. Cigarettes, matches and playing cards
  27. Gas mask bag
  28. Two grenades – the no 36 Mills grenade was used in the First World War and the No 69 Bakelite, which was in service from 1942 and caused less collateral damage
  29. Fairbairn and Sykes fighting knife – used as a general tool – and it’s sheaf
  30. Large roll gas cape
  31. Gas mask – the light pack gas mask was issued from 1943-1960
  32. Anti gas ointment
  33. Anti gas hood
  34. Eye shield for gas attack
  35. Groundsheet (underneath) with a sewing kit and thimble on top
  36. Maroon airborne forces beret with a parachute regiment cap badge
  37. Torch
  38. First aid dressing
  39. Helmet – Mark II parachuting helmet issued in 1942 with a leather chin strap

1916 private soldier, Battle of the Somme

A photographer, Thom Atkinson, has documented 13 military kits in a series called ‘Soldiers Inventories’. I’ve picked a few to share with you guys over a couple of posts so they can be enjoyed individually, in all their glory. It will also show which are the most popular kits. 

By its very nature, war requires a soldier to be prepared for every possible eventuality. The sheer amount of gear that is demanded by this level of preparedness means good pack configuration is a necessity. It is really interesting to see how a soldiers carry has developed over time, so I encourage you all to check out the full set here

Thanks to thenewartemis for their post that reminded me about seeing this in their post here. Below is a breakdown of what is featured above:

  1. Hob nail boots
  2. Puttees (for binding trousers around lower legs)
  3. Socks
  4. Shirt and vest
  5. Gas mask container
  6. Gas mask
  7. Non Commissioned ranks hat
  8. Notebook and service warrant card
  9. Battledress tunic – note stripes on sleeve denote rank
  10. Mess tins
  11. Tin opener and can of food, appears to be tinned stewed apple
  12. Oxo cubes
  13. Bar of chocolate
  14. Bar of soap
  15. Water flask
  16. Belt
  17. Leather belt with leather pouches for kit
  18. Haversack
  19. Longjohn under garments, battledress trousers and braces
  20. Boot polish and two brushes
  21. Blankets
  22. Dog tags – imprinted with name, rank and service number
  23. Trench club – for breaking heavy ground for trenching into and for fighting the enemy at close quarters
  24. Entrenching tool handle; often the handle was customised with lumps of metal and made into a trench club
  25. Leather pouch for entrenching tool
  26. Field dressing
  27. Cigarettes and matches
  28. Mess kit containing knife, fork spoon, shaving brush, soap and brass button polisher (slid underneath battledress button to protect BD from polish)
  29. Polish
  30. Razor
  31. Gun oil
  32. Cloth for pull-through for cleaning barrels internally
  33. Bullet
  34. Ammunition belt, containing clips of bullets
  35. Penknife and pull through cord
  36. Entrenching tool spade; sometimes soldiers sharpened the edges of the spade and used these to fight
  37. Lee Enfield 303 bolt action rifle. It was developed at the beginning of the twentieth century as an attempt to create a standard rifle for both the infantry and soldiers on horseback. As it turned out it was ideally suited to conditions in the trenches – it wasn’t good at firing over long distances, but was really robust and could stand up to the mud. It was still used right up into the 1950s.
  38. Bayonet – to be attached to fore end of rifle
  39. Helmet – with cover
  40. Fob watch, personal effects. Officers tended to have pocket watches more so than infantry soldiers
  41. Coins – possibly local francs or similar, personal effects
  42. Scabbard for bayonet, worn on leather belt around waist over hip
  43. 5 round ammunition clips – ready to load magazine of 303 rifle

Milspec elastic retains the holder closed. Pull the elastic off of the unit to open The lid is sewn to keep it covering your tools and to prevent accidental loss/glare Holds shims, lock pick sets, keys, photon freedom or similar light, EZ decoder, Quick Sticks and more

Law Industries Final Prototype Testing

Editor: Here is an interesting tool roll style pouch that follows a similar style to the ITS Tactical, Triple Aught Design and SERE Pick collaboration that we featured here, which I made my own version of here. I like this streamlined version and this its smaller size would work really well. It looks well finished too. Check out Law Industries write up of what they’ve done:

law66: This final prototype is one thats really simple but really useful! An elastic closure holds everything tightly together and expands or contracts depending on what you carry. Once you pull it back over itself you can unfold the roll and lift the cover.

Inside there is plenty of space for a combination of tools, and if required a light to help you. Sections that are sewn help organise your shims, EZ Decoders, lock pick sets, Photon Freedom light, handcuff keys, quick sticks or anything else you need including mini cyalumes! Not just one of each, you can pack a few of each into the kit and it will still close.

The rear has a loop for adding a lanyard for easy carry or just drop it into a pocket. By far one of the most useful tool kits you can have with you at any time no matter what you are wearing. The all black 1000D cordura means it will take all of the work day you have and still not cause a problem.

The lid is sewn to favor it wanting to close preventing loss while you get to grips with the task at hand! When you are done, fold the sides in, pull over the elastic closure and off you go. Simple works best, this is the most complex item in its simplest form.

Once final testing is complete these will be made available! How do you feel about an item like this?

Found here

Interesting Load Bearing Kit

Some interesting images of the packs these Marines carried on a beach assault exercise.

militaryarmament: Marines assigned to 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force arrives at Bellows Beach for a beach assault exercise during Rim of the Pacific Exercise 2014. July 27, 2014.

Interesting Loadout

Here is quite a nice bag dump of a 36 hour kit.

abolish-me: Kitlist as follows…

On our radar: Tactical Bot

Editor: Thanks to Tactical Bot for sharing this 1-day loadout with us. It’s always great to see stuff from here in UK. Definitely following this blog for all the future posts. Here’s details of the above:

tacticalbot: So I’m off for a few days in the hills with my buddy. Haven’t decided where yet. Here’s my day sack and what I’m going to be carrying in it. Mainly hill safety stuff and a few extras. Everything gets waterproofed in individual dry-sacks and then in one main dry-sack. The click-top tupperware is for fresh food on the day.

I was a little lazy initially posting this without identifying all the kit I’m taking, so without further ado: 

  • Lowe Pro Airzone 35L - Purchased last year and so far I’ve used it on a dozen or so hill days. Cracking pack with a air zone behind my back. I don’t know about anyone else, but I get a terrifyingly sweaty back when out in the hills, couple that with strong winds and it soon gets cold.
  • Haglofs Softshell - Pretty much all you need coupled with a decent wicking base layer. I normally use Helly Hanson Lifa Tops. Or if its colder a Helly Hanson Marino wool top.
  • Salomon Quest 4D GTX - Amazing boots that suit all seasons in the hills and most of the year in the mountains.
  • Arcteryx Zeta AR jacket - Superb lightweight jacket with a stowaway hood. Ideal for an occasional jacket.
  • Tupperware - For fresh food/butties, and brew kit.
  • Emergency MRE - Kept at the bottom of my pack for emergency use only.
  • Glowsticks - never know when you might go to a rave, or need emergency lighting.
  • Maxpedition pouch containing EDC - please see my previous posts for details on whats in here.
  • Multimat small mat - for when you stop for lunch, always nicer to sit on something dry and comfortable rather than a rock.
  • Throw line and carabiners - Knotted in a way that reduces length/tangles, but can be released by pulling it. An essential bit of kit if you’re not technical mountaineering.
  • Exped medic pack - containing various CAT, bandages, dressings, tough cuts, glass breaker, flares, plasters (band aid) and other other essential first aid/ trauma items.
  • Jetboil - simply the best gas cooker available on the market. Fast, easy, economical, tidy and self contained.
  • Gransfors Bruk Small forest axe - I’d prefer a small hatchet, but this thing is incredible. And funnily enough, it seems to be more acceptable to carry an axe around in the UK rather than a small fixed blade knife?!?
  • Sunscreen - It gets hot and sunny, people get burnt, I do not wish to be one of them.
  • Toilet paper - Just incase.
  • Emergency Bothy Shelter - Big enough for 2 and a dog.
  • 2 Camelbak 750ml water bottles - Really good bottles that last. 1.5 litres is the minimum I’d carry. I normally carry a 2L platypus reservoir too.
  • Swedish Folding Cup - I’ve had this for years and I always find uses for it. So it always goes with me into the wild.
  • Warm kit - Minimum kit I think you need to take with you, even for one day, is socks, gloves, hat, long sleeved top and something like a shamagh/scarf.

On my person I’ll be carrying:

  • 3 different sized ortlieb waterproof cases - One large for a map, 1 medium for my wallet/passport/torch and one small for my iPhone.
  • Petzl Tactikka - The same one I carry in tactical situations. Perfect sized and robust.
  • Leatherman Wave - I actually sent my old wave off the other week to be repaired under warranty, I’d owned it for about 15 years (it had been to Afghanistan and Iraq as well as a few places in Africa). They said it couldn’t be repaired and so sent me a brand new one. I’m going to miss that old wave.
  • Casio G Shock 5600 - Old school looks, but still brilliant.
  • Garmin forerunner 101 - great little wrist worn GPS. I use this for all my outdoor sports.

32/Male/Military/UK

Found here

Team Rubicon Patch Update

I want to start by saying a massive thank you to everyone who demonstrated their support by pre-ordering the Pack Config fundraising patch for Team Rubicon. Thanks to your amazing support we have passed the halfway mark of our aim to sell 500 patches to raise money for this worthy cause.

The patches are now currently in production and above is a proof of what they will look like. I’m sure you’ll agree that they look pretty awesome. With only a little over 200 patches left, now is the time to order to avoid disappointment. 

Please do your part to help us reach this goal by pre-ordering your patch(es) today. Orders can be made in the sidebar of any of the pages on our site, or for more details please visit our store using the link below. 

If you are visiting us from a mobile device, please click on the icon (see below image) in the top right hand corner of the site to find the purchasing panel.

To help illustrate the full reach of their work across the global, I’ve included an image of the TR Field Operations map that details their deployments over the past 4 years. To find out more about the work of TR, please visit their Field Operations page or their website.

Browse Pack Config’s – Team Rubicon Week here